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New to VO and music production - Kaustav Acharya - 07-08-2019

Hey everyone!

So I started my music production journey less than a year ago and have recently been inspired to venture into Virtual Orchestral
Music.
Been listening to Waters of Redemption by Mattias and am awestruck by the sheer beauty of the compositions and the virtual orchestration prowess. I had made this simple hybrid piece using pure synthesis and all the sounds were made without any samples/resampling.

https://soundcloud.com/theexponent/daydream

My aim is to explore orchestral compositions (cinematic or otherwise) but this is all very overwhelming for a complete beginner like me and wanted some guidance on how to approach learning orchestral composition from scratch. Looking forward to your views and responses. 

Have a great day!


RE: New to VO and music production - bigcat1969 - 07-08-2019

HI there. Welcome in. Nice sounding piece of music!


RE: New to VO and music production - Kaustav Acharya - 07-08-2019

(07-08-2019, 02:27 PM)bigcat1969 Wrote: HI there. Welcome in. Nice sounding piece of music!

Thanks a lot bigcat1969! I used your VSCO2 VSTs to add some orchestral instruments to this piece https://soundcloud.com/theexponent/desolation

Looking forward to some guidance on how to learn composing, orchestrating and arranging. There's a lot of information scattered all around, making it too overwhelming for a beginner to learn how to go about composing and producing. Any good basic resources to lay a strong foundation for VO?


RE: New to VO and music production - Michael Willis - 07-08-2019

(07-08-2019, 02:34 PM)Kaustav Acharya Wrote: Any good basic resources to lay a strong foundation for VO?

Start with these articles if you haven't read them yet.

I enjoyed listened to some of the stuff on your Sound Cloud account. I think you're plenty creative enough, I'm looking forward to hearing what you create as you learn more about virtual orchestration.


RE: New to VO and music production - bigcat1969 - 07-08-2019

I have to admit I know very little about really creating music. I'm more an instrument maker than user. In fact the thread where all the guys here tried to explain it all to me is another great starting point. Mattias, Sam, Michael and others who I'm forgetting are the digital composers here. They just let me hang around for laughs.


RE: New to VO and music production - Kaustav Acharya - 07-08-2019

(07-08-2019, 03:38 PM)Michael Willis Wrote:
(07-08-2019, 02:34 PM)Kaustav Acharya Wrote: Any good basic resources to lay a strong foundation for VO?

Start with these articles if you haven't read them yet.

I enjoyed listened to some of the stuff on your Sound Cloud account. I think you're plenty creative enough, I'm looking forward to hearing what you create as you learn more about virtual orchestration.

Thanks Michael. I did go through those articles before, they are very insightful. I'll try to find more information on composition and arrangement.

Thanks bigcat, I'll try to scourge the various threads on the forum and find more information that already exists.


RE: New to VO and music production - Paul Battersby - 07-08-2019

(07-08-2019, 06:19 AM)Kaustav Acharya Wrote: ... wanted some guidance on how to approach learning orchestral composition from scratch.

Have a look at my blog table of contents. You might find some useful links about composition and orchestration.

Virtual Playing Orchestra - Blog table of contents

Performing a YouTube search for "Live Composing" might be useful too.


RE: New to VO and music production - Mattias Westlund - 07-08-2019

Welcome to the forum Kaustav Acharya, and thank you for your kind words regarding Waters. To tell you the truth, I don't have a lot of suggestions for how to learn composing and arranging since I'm not formally trained. I've been doing the orchestral thing for over two decades now but I still don't feel comfortable with handing out advice on writing music because, well, half the time I don't know what I'm doing.

OK, I'm exaggerating, but you know what I mean. I work mostly by ear and I lack the training and terminology to properly explain why I choose to do this or that in my music. So any "songwriting tips" I could hand out are likely to be useless unless you happen to have the exact same musical background and preferences and knowledge as me. And everything I can tell you about arranging for orchestra can be read about in much more detail if you just google the subject.

Listening to The Exponent I can hear that you have some understanding of music in general and I can kind of, sort of hear what you're going for. If I were to offer one suggestion it's this: first decide whether you want to write orchestral music or electronica. I'm not saying one rules out the other (lots of people including myself combine the two) but you need to be decently familiar with both in order to make a successful crossover. You don't want your hybrid track to sound like an orchestra with token synth sounds, or a typical electronic music track with a bit of strings or brass thrown in for good measure. Understanding how and when to blend both genres is key.

Other than that: just listen to a lot to music you like and try to figure out what's going on. Actually, I think that's probably the best advice I can give on the topic of how to write [genre] music. Listen. Attempt to play it on whatever instrument you're most proficient at. Think, analyze, experiment. And then just keep at it for as long as it takes. There aren't any shortcut's I'm afraid.


RE: New to VO and music production - Mattias Westlund - 07-08-2019

(07-08-2019, 04:58 PM)bigcat1969 Wrote: I have to admit I know very little about really creating music. I'm more an instrument maker than user. In fact the thread where all the guys here tried to explain it all to me is another great starting point. Mattias, Sam, Michael and others who I'm forgetting are the digital composers here. They just let me hang around for laughs.

Bigcat is a humble guy so don't pay any attention to that. Smile He may not be a VO nerd like others here, but he has an ear for music and instruments and has probably created more free VSTi's and other resources for music making than anyone alive. He's the Scotty of our musical Enterprise, while the rest of us are up on the bridge shouting commands and poking at interface controls and expecting the proper things to happen.


RE: New to VO and music production - Kaustav Acharya - 07-09-2019

(07-08-2019, 09:12 PM)Mattias Westlund Wrote: Welcome to the forum Kaustav Acharya, and thank you for your kind words regarding Waters. To tell you the truth, I don't have a lot of suggestions for how to learn composing and arranging since I'm not formally trained. I've been doing the orchestral thing for over two decades now but I still don't feel comfortable with handing out advice on writing music because, well, half the time I don't know what I'm doing.

OK, I'm exaggerating, but you know what I mean. I work mostly by ear and I lack the training and terminology to properly explain why I choose to do this or that in my music. So any "songwriting tips" I could hand out are likely to be useless unless you happen to have the exact same musical background and preferences and knowledge as me. And everything I can tell you about arranging for orchestra can be read about in much more detail if you just google the subject.

Listening to The Exponent I can hear that you have some understanding of music in general and I can kind of, sort of hear what you're going for. If I were to offer one suggestion it's this: first decide whether you want to write orchestral music or electronica. I'm not saying one rules out the other (lots of people including myself combine the two) but you need to be decently familiar with both in order to make a successful crossover. You don't want your hybrid track to sound like an orchestra with token synth sounds, or a typical electronic music track with a bit of strings or brass thrown in for good measure. Understanding how and when to blend both genres is key.

Other than that: just listen to a lot to music you like and try to figure out what's going on. Actually, I think that's probably the best advice I can give on the topic of how to write [genre] music. Listen. Attempt to play it on whatever instrument you're most proficient at. Think, analyze, experiment. And then just keep at it for as long as it takes. There aren't any shortcut's I'm afraid.

Thanks a ton Mattias! This is very valuable advice. 

Thanks Paul, I already went through most of your blog posts and have been sketching with VPO. 

You guys are all awesome Smile