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We made it bigger... and quite possibly better...





I also finally got around to sampling myself on recorder, which I have wanted to do proper for a long time.
So what are the new additions?
(12-22-2016, 06:01 PM)bigcat1969 Wrote: [ -> ]So what are the new additions?

Here's the official change log-
• Added 28 new “Ensembles”- collections of instruments in easy to play patches.
• Added Sopranino, Soprano, Alto, Tenor, and Bass Baroque recorders.
• Added Blown Bottle, Flutophone, Small Ocarina, Tin Whistle, Wooden Fife (traditional flute),Mayan Flute (whistle), Native American Flute (whistle), and Tibetan Flute (“bansuri”).
• Added Horn Section (5P), Trumpet Section (3P), and Tenor Trombone III.
• Improved many brass with combined “Staccato + Sustain” patches.
• Added NV -> Singing patch to Cello Section.
• Improved vibrato handling in WIPS on many instruments.

The video playlist above goes through all the new stuff in action. Smile
I like Sam and I hadn't quite blown my entire Christmas presents to myself budget, so I figured why not and the truth is I'm glad I did. There is a lot of good sounding stuff in here. I read a review that said the Woodwinds were good and that was an area of need. And they are nice, but what I didn't expect was all this fun to be had with Mayan, Native American and Tibetan wood flutes, a fife and five recorders. The only downside is no sections / duets but since there seem to be two of everything you can kinda roll your own. Plus most things are pretty heavily sampled we are talking 300+ samples for most woodwinds and 75 to 100 megs or more of ncw compressed samples. I mean even the flutophone tops 300 samples...
The interface is very nice. There is easy access to reverb and you can dump articulations and mic positions you don't need. Speaking of articulations and mic positions, they are a bit variable by instrument. One version of an instrument might have close mic while the other doesn't and some instruments have only sustain and staccato while other have all kinda of cool emotive sustains and trills. I'm still looking at the woodwinds here, I'll irritate you with thought on the other sections some other time. Still while there might be some inconsistencies, it is such raw fun to mess with everything from standard orchestra woodwinds to baroque recorders to wooden flutes to a blown bottle, a flutophone and a tin whistle that I say blow the fife for this woodwind section which might be worth the price of admission alone.

Oh and Sam did you fake all those recorders and flutes or did you really get your hands on them?
(12-22-2016, 10:21 PM)bigcat1969 Wrote: [ -> ]I like Sam and I hadn't quite blown my entire Christmas presents to myself budget, so I figured why not and the truth is I'm glad I did. There is a lot of good sounding stuff in here. I read a review that said the Woodwinds were good and that was an area of need.  And they are nice, but what I didn't expect was all this fun to be had with Mayan, Native American and Tibetan wood flutes, a fife and five recorders. The only downside is no sections / duets but since there seem to be two of everything you can kinda roll your own. Plus most things are pretty heavily sampled we are talking 300+ samples for most woodwinds and 75 to 100 megs or more of ncw compressed samples. I mean even the flutophone tops 300 samples...
The interface is very nice. There is easy access to reverb and you can dump articulations and mic positions you don't need. Speaking of articulations and mic positions, they are a bit variable by instrument. One version of an instrument might have close mic while the other doesn't and some instruments have only sustain and staccato while other have all kinda of cool emotive sustains and trills. I'm still looking at the woodwinds here, I'll irritate you with thought on the other sections some other time. Still while there might be some inconsistencies, it is such raw fun to mess with everything from standard orchestra woodwinds to baroque recorders to wooden flutes to a blown bottle, a flutophone and a tin whistle that I say blow the fife for this woodwind section which might be worth the price of admission alone.

Oh and Sam did you fake all those recorders and flutes or did you really get your hands on them?

Thanks for checking it out, BC! Really, it means a lot to me. With a schmancy library like Chamber Orchestra 2, you get to be a cool guy now, like this:  Cool

All of the flutes and recorders are real separate instruments, aside from the Contrabass, Greatbass, and Sopraninino. In fact, the UI pictures are almost always of the exact instrument in question whenever possible (some of the brass are a bit less so, but generally it is the case).

The idea with mic positions is that some instruments need them while others don't really. For example, one trumpet has a ton of positions so that you can find what works best, but another has only one or two because it's pre-designed to sound best that way. Also, of course, it is difficult to use the exact same setup when you are changing between many places, so smaller rooms don't have far mics (it would sound bad and not be very useful). To me, if consistency was the point of sampling, then everyone should just use GM Soundcanvas- it is incredibly consistent. The inconsistencies and unique elements are what give the instruments character, individuality, and reality in my humble opinion. Smile

BTW, for sections, you can layer instruments together on the same MIDI channel (e.g. Flute I + Flute II + Flute III = Flute Section). Check out the "Ensemble" folder for some examples of this in action. Wink
So I started messing with the brass and while euphoric about having 2 cool Euphoniums, I missed a Flugelhorn (about the only esoteric instrument not here) and discovered I had one in another collection. As I was flugeling and euphoning, I looked at the instruments from the different companies and remembered that I'd wanted to try and figure out how these new fangled CC controlled instruments worked. I was going to ask on VI, but someone already had a post about it. So I've tried using the Nil's Liberg kontakt 2 script (guess it isn't so new fangled) along with the WIPs scripts. So does any of it work, do they conflict? Should I have a separate nki for the WIPs legato and the CC kind of like Sam has separate scripted legato patchs ? Should I have separate nkis for the shorts and the longs? Why did I ever decide to become a digital instrument maker?

http://www.mediafire.com/file/a55iy3tngg...C_Nils.zip
(12-27-2016, 05:43 PM)bigcat1969 Wrote: [ -> ]So I started messing with the brass and while euphoric about having 2 cool Euphoniums, I missed a Flugelhorn (about the only esoteric instrument not here) and discovered I had one in another collection. As I was flugeling and euphoning, I looked at the instruments from the different companies and remembered that I'd wanted to try and figure out how these new fangled CC controlled instruments worked. I was going to ask on VI, but someone already had a post about it. So I've tried using the Nil's Liberg kontakt 2 script (guess it isn't so new fangled) along with the WIPs scripts. So does any of it work, do they conflict? Should I have a separate nki for the WIPs legato and the CC kind of like Sam has separate scripted legato patchs ? Should I have separate nkis for the shorts and the longs? Why did I ever decide to become a digital instrument maker?

http://www.mediafire.com/file/a55iy3tngg...C_Nils.zip

Well, theoretically everything should work. The problem we (well, to be honest Simon, the guy who actually does the Kontakt work) ran into was that WIPS only allows a certain number of groups.That's why our WIPS and multi-mic patches are separated.

Maybe you should talk to Tonalizt, the guy who makes the Alpine Instruments. I do believe he knows quite a bit about Kontakt scripting, and since his libraries are free, there's a good chance he'd be willing to let you use or at least look at his source code. I believe you can reach him either here or by sending an e-mail on the Alpine Instruments site. Smile
Thanks Mr. Sam. I hope you had a Merry Christmas and a good sale. I've been playing Oh Holy Night on the Alto Trumpet and the Alto Saxhorn mostly solo and also duet. It is pretty cool to just be able to listen to the instruments and hear how they sound. The Saxhorn is so smooth and the Trumpet has a nice bite to it. I suppose real musicians / composers already know all this stuff, but it is fun for us novices to hear the variations in sound.

I'm also enjoying (or will enjoy) the various mic positions and articulations. Main and Mid are roughly the same distance right and the Ribbon and Close the same distance?
(12-27-2016, 06:37 PM)bigcat1969 Wrote: [ -> ]Thanks Mr. Sam. I hope you had a Merry Christmas and a good sale. I've been playing Oh Holy Night on the Alto Trumpet and the Alto Saxhorn mostly solo and also duet. It is pretty cool to just be able to listen to the instruments and hear how they sound. The Saxhorn is so smooth and the Trumpet has a nice bite to it. I suppose real musicians / composers already know all this stuff, but it is fun for us novices to hear the variations in sound.

I'm also enjoying (or will enjoy) the various mic positions and articulations. Main and Mid are roughly the same distance right and the Ribbon and Close the same distance?

Yep! That's how the mic positions work. Sometimes with some brass the Ribbon is the "Rear" or "Bell" mic and is actually behind the bell of the instrument, giving an ultra-warm "player position" sound.

I actually had to record the alto trumpet with a trombone mouthpiece, so it is maybe a bit overly warm, haha. Regarding the Flugelhorn, it was something we considered sampling, but ended up being unable to find a good enough instrument in the place we were recording. Perhaps in a future patch... Wink
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