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If anyone's feeling creative, I could use your help. I'm trying to come up with a number of fictional quotes to be used as flavor text in the world resource I'm putting together. Each section will have a quote at the top, like so:

INTRODUCTION
An arrow’s path is straight and swift, the path to wisdom is neither. — Esman of Jafir

HISTORY
Like a man who builds a house out of twigs, one who studies history must learn to accept the gaps. For if there is one single truth in this world, it is that more has been forgotten than what is known. — Poliboros

THE ULDANI EMPIRE
Despite these recent setbacks, the Empire will surely stand glorious until the end of ages. — Regane of Torin

NATIONS AND REGIONS
How can one rule the world if one does not know it? — Ul

POLITICAL SITUATION
Beware not only of those who wish you ill, for an enemy with honor is lesser a threat than a friend without. — Unknown

RACES
While men now hold dominion over this world, it was not always so. — Poliboros

BESTIARY
Chores come first and then comes play, or grinks will steal your nose away. — Nursery rhyme

RELIGION
Like a thousand mountain brooks converging into a river, the faith of the righteous shall wash all sins away. — Dochias

The wording of some of the above isn't perfect, but you get the idea. So what do I need help with? Well, there are several more sections, namely Geography, The Uldani Empire, Notable Locations, Prominent Figures, Organizations, Magic, The Year and Miscellaneous. And I'm running low on fitting quotes. So if you'd like to take a stab at coming up with one, go right ahead!

It can be anything, basically. Insightful/clever/ironic/etc or just fitting in some way for the topic at hand. As for the source, it could be a philosopher, historian or other scholar, a king or emperor, a poet or even something from a proverb or a song. You don't need to make up fictional characters, I can probably come up with some existing historical person to attribute it to. Paraphrasing something from our world is fine, as long as it's not something super recognizable like Churchill quotes or similar.

Any takers? Smile
I have two for you that may fit.

Geography:
From these old roads, the world awaits us, spreading in all directions, each as wondrous as the next. --Travelogue of Fanivir

The Year:
Seasons turn and the sun passes / From night follows day, and again, in reverse / Day becomes week, then month, then year / We act today / Our eyes not seeing tomorrow / But time will tell. It always does. --Unknown Poet
(11-12-2019, 04:03 PM)Terry93D Wrote: [ -> ]I have two for you that may fit.

Geography:
From these old roads, the world awaits us, spreading in all directions, each as wondrous as the next. --Travelogue of Fanivir

The Year:
Seasons turn and the sun passes / From night follows day, and again, in reverse / Day becomes week, then month, then year / We act today / Our eyes not seeing tomorrow / But time will tell. It always does. --Unknown Poet

That's great, thanks! You came up with these on the spot?
Just wanted to say that I read the first 22 chapters and I really think that this is shaping up to be a good fantasy book. The world building is excellent and the plot has me curious about what comes next. Read it, I think you will enjoy it.
Thanks bigcat!

I wish someone would have told me when I started this project that once you start building your world and writing a novel set in it, new ideas are going to spawn and grow exponentially, vying for attention. Right now -- in addition to Strands of Darkness and the sequel -- I have two short stories planned, one called A Midwinter's Tail (no, not a typo) detailing the events when Rynn, Jedd and Olvan first met Eraig, and one called The Wolves of Northreach, in which we'll get some background on Haldan and the mercenary company I knew he had been a member of the same moment I wrote him saying, "I wasn't always a bandit".

So this is exciting and a little scary all at the same time. Seems I have a lot of stories waiting to be told.
OK, language question again. I'm using various made-up words for societal classes (mainly from the Uldani Empire) like estator, patrican, judiciate and obligate along with "real" titles like magistrate, prefect, emperor etc. So far I've been capitalizing them all to be clear -- "obligate" in particular can be misread otherwise -- but reading through the novel, it sometimes looks weird. Like, we all know what a king is, we don't need to capitalize it. But I feel some consistency is in order. If I capitalize Estator, I need to capitalize Magistrate too. Or neither.

Also: How clever do I want to be about it? When Lilian (a person from Imperial times) says Magistrate I could capitalize it. When Jedd says the same word, it's just a bloody "magistrate". So it's not like I absolutely have to be consistent either. But... gaaah!

Thoughts?
(01-31-2020, 08:51 PM)Mattias Westlund Wrote: [ -> ]OK, language question again. I'm using various made-up words for societal classes (mainly from the Uldani Empire) like estator, patrican, judiciate and obligate along with "real" titles like magistrate, prefect, emperor etc. So far I've been capitalizing them all to be clear -- "obligate" in particular can be misread otherwise -- but reading through the novel, it sometimes looks weird. Like, we all know what a king is, we don't need to capitalize it. But I feel some consistency is in order. If I capitalize Estator, I need to capitalize Magistrate too. Or neither.

Also: How clever do I want to be about it? When Lilian (a person from Imperial times) says Magistrate I could capitalize it. When Jedd says the same word, it's just a bloody "magistrate". So it's not like I absolutely have to be consistent either. But... gaaah!

Thoughts?

If these titles are introduced in dialogue capitalized, then I think you can get away with leaving it uncapitalized in text if it's not referring to an individual. (You refer to the example of a king, but nobody says king Henry. It's always King Henry.) Similarly with speech - if it's used as a title, yeah, Estator, but if you're just talking casually about the local estator (I don't know if there are such local estators, I have not been keeping up w/ SoD unfortunately), that'd be different.

The obligate error... that seems probable. I can suggest alternatives, though feel free not to use: rector, provost, alderman, lictor, reeve, prior, palatine - Wikipedia has some lists of titles and there is a truly impressive number of Greek titles waiting for misuse.

The other stickler that I spot is patrican, which seems weird when patrician is standing right there. Why chop a letter off of a perfectly fine word?

I really like judiciate, though. It sounds like a real title. "Who's that Judiciate walking down the square?" I may have to snatch that one for myself.
Terry's right. You only capitalize the job title if it's part of a personal title like King Henry VII. If it's just any king then it's just another noun in the sentence. This is true even if you are referring to King Henry but you haven't named him by his official title in the sentence: "King Henry VII lived in England. He was king from 1509 to 1547. As king, Henry initiated the English Reformation" (choppily paraphrased from Wikipedia). I would suggest you follow this rule in both exposition and dialogue. The characters can't see whether the words are capitalized when they're talking to each other. Any special meaning behind a word might have for a character will need to be disclosed via context.

https://www.quickanddirtytips.com/educat...job-titles

I agree with Terry's thoughts on these titles: good stuff, but patrican is perhaps too close to patrician.
Terry, Nayrb, thank you for clearing that up. It makes sense, when I think about it, to capitalize a title when attached to a specific person. I've never actually made that connection! And I'm not sure books I've read are all 100% consistent in this matter either, which makes things even more confusing. So in other words (using an example from SoD) the Steward Lothandel should be referred to as the Steward, but his office is simply that of a steward. Right?

As for "patrican"... I know. Wink I was trying to come up with something antiquated-sounding but you're right, it's too close. I'll need to think of something else. Terry: Regarding judiciate, thanks! A judiciate was basically a senator in Uldani times; a patrican (or, well, whatever I'm going to call this upper layer of land-owning nobles) that has temporarily given up his lands and duties to serve in the Tribunate, the Uldani senate.

Edit: To be clear, the reason I'm not just using existing Roman titles is that I don't want to overdo it with the Roman influences. Yes, the Uldani were similar in many ways, but not exactly the same. And sure, I could just make up random stuff like blaghor or fnugtweg for titles. But I want it to sound like actual words in English.
(02-01-2020, 10:32 PM)Mattias Westlund Wrote: [ -> ]Terry, Nayrb, thank you for clearing that up. It makes sense, when I think about it, to capitalize a title when attached to a specific person. I've never actually made that connection! And I'm not sure books I've read are all 100% consistent in this matter either, which makes things even more confusing. So in other words (using an example from SoD) the Steward Lothandel should be referred to as the Steward, but his office is simply that of a steward. Right?

As for "patrican"... I know. Wink I was trying to come up with something antiquated-sounding but you're right, it's too close. I'll need to think of something else. Terry: Regarding judiciate, thanks! A judiciate was basically a senator in Uldani times; a patrican (or, well, whatever I'm going to call this upper layer of land-owning nobles) that has temporarily given up his lands and duties to serve in the Tribunate, the Uldani senate.

Edit: To be clear, the reason I'm not just using existing Roman titles is that I don't want to overdo it with the Roman influences. Yes, the Uldani were similar in many ways, but not exactly the same. And sure, I could just make up random stuff like blaghor or fnugtweg for titles. But I want it to sound like actual words in English.

That seems correct. My linguistics knowledge is pure dilettante, I can't speak intelligently about grammar at all. But yeah. Titles are capitalized when referring to individuals, even if you're referring to that individual by name and only by title; and titles would not be capitalized when referring to the body as a whole. "Let's go see the steward" as opposed to "All the land's stewards were gathered," to give a concrete example.

I think you should switch patrician and judiciate. Judiciate leads me to thoughts of the law and of legal systems, and so does Tribunate, which sounds similar to Tribunal. My brain forms an automatic linkage: the Judiciates of the Tribunate. (Similarly, patrician makes me think of the aristocracy.) This is just my opinion, ofcourse.
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