Scoring Central

Full Version: Fighting Fantasy Legends WIP's
You're currently viewing a stripped down version of our content. View the full version with proper formatting.
Pages: 1 2 3 4
I've just posted a bunch of WIP's from a game project I'm currently working on. Can't tell you exactly what... yet.

Anyway, this is kind of sketchy in a lot of places but it should give you a general idea of what it's going to sound like in the end.

Nice! There's a great mix of frantic thumping rhythms with dramatic harmonic progressions, and I hear nice use of the phrygian dominant scale that you love so much.

(01-30-2017, 04:40 PM)Mattias Westlund Wrote: [ -> ]Can't tell you exactly what... yet.

You really know how to place the bait, don't you?
Man, I love that main motif! It's very dark yet beautiful. I will have it in my head for many days, haha.

Really nice use of contrast in "Overture". I'd love it if more of that contrast was just as strong in some others, with perhaps more varied B-sections. I've found that in looping music, even though it sounds totally counter-intuitive, a considerably different B section (e.g. modulation, dropping or changing of most instruments, new theme or deconstruction of theme through subdivison, etc.) is actually the key to making a loop that isn't noticeable. It's easy to assume for a loop that you want consistency, but having that contrast in there helps make the player "forget" what they have already heard and relaxes them in preparation for resuming the initial idea, so they are in a constant state of re-discovery. Some people, even professional musicians have commented on such loops, "Wow, this is a really long piece!" not realizing it had looped several times. I play my loops when I finish (and the client often does the same) and if they and I both forget we have them playing, it's done it's job imho. Smile

It's also important to be careful with over-using the main motif. It sounds pretty good here, but it's just something to watch out for. I often have 3-5 key motifs I swap around between, or when the main motif is starting to get tired out, do a variation on it (a simple one is going into major or minor or a mode, or to play the inversion or retrograde (backwards); I've even deconstructed the motif and used it as a transitionary repeated phrase- go wild!). Or you can always be like me and quote Wagner somewhere, hahaha.

That trumpet you are using is very nice! Everything sounds very good in general, especially the percussion. The strings are a bit weak/thin, but I guess they aren't the center of attention, so that's totally fine. In general, the mix sounds quite professional especially for a WIP and although the samples themselves aren't $1000 sample library wet dreams, you managed to make them work really well and that's something worth praise.

In general, the style reminds me a bit of late 90's film music, probably my favorite period. Sort of the "last hurrah" for post-Romantic orchestral writing. The ethnic elements blend in very nicely and the sense of rhythm and phrasing is both excellent and spot-on in my opinion.
Thanks Sam, some great feedback there. I really need to head off to bed now, just one thing:

(01-30-2017, 07:30 PM)Samulis Wrote: [ -> ]In general, the style reminds me a bit of late 90's film music, probably my favorite period. Sort of the "last hurrah" for post-Romantic orchestral writing.

That is one damn big compliment, thanks! For me, the last dying twitch of the classic Hollywood type of soundtracks was Harry Gregson-Williams' score for The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe. I really can't recall any movie whose music made me go "wow!" and gave me goosebumps after that. And that was 2005...
(01-30-2017, 09:32 PM)Mattias Westlund Wrote: [ -> ]Thanks Sam, some great feedback there. I really need to head off to bed now, just one thing:

(01-30-2017, 07:30 PM)Samulis Wrote: [ -> ]In general, the style reminds me a bit of late 90's film music, probably my favorite period. Sort of the "last hurrah" for post-Romantic orchestral writing.

That is one damn big compliment, thanks! For me, the last dying twitch of the classic Hollywood type of soundtracks was Harry Gregson-Williams' score for The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe. I really can't recall any movie whose music made me go "wow!" and gave me goosebumps after that. And that was 2005...

Haha WOW! I had the exact same experience with the exact same film. I used to just sit on the DVD main title page just to hear the main theme loop over and over again. It captured my imagination as a teenager at the time- THAT was epic music, not a gajillion taikos and cellos doing straight eighths over trombones who ate too many beans.

The only other film I was impressed by was John Powell's score to How to Train a Dragon, but not as much as LWW. In a similar vein, Percy Jackson and the Olympians (bad film, good score- Christophe Beck) had a pretty classic style score- it's pretty much textbook and is full of great examples of the various tricks and techniques of hollywood writing and orchestration.
Very cool! This really reminds me of Nobuo Uematsu's soundtrack for The Last Story. Very similar sound, and with the same sense of drama. Except more ethnic instruments, which are also really cool. I like the way you've managed to get lots of variety while still making it all sound coherent.
I'd be happy if my finished work sounded like your work in progress.

There is a lot of depth here in the way you use the orchestra for counterpoint, rhythmic support and accents. Music worthy of study. It all sounds very clean, well thought out. I would have had a lot of fun performing this music back when I was a percussionist in my high school orchestra because your music always seems to give the percussion section lots of interesting parts to play.
(01-30-2017, 07:30 PM)Samulis Wrote: [ -> ]That trumpet you are using is very nice!

If you mean the solo trumpet that is actually from the old UoI samples! I have a variety of solo brass but for some reason this one fit right in with the overall sound of the orchestra.


(01-30-2017, 07:30 PM)Samulis Wrote: [ -> ]The strings are a bit weak/thin, but I guess they aren't the center of attention, so that's totally fine. In general, the mix sounds quite professional especially for a WIP and although the samples themselves aren't $1000 sample library wet dreams, you managed to make them work really well and that's something worth praise.

Definitely know what you mean about the strings. This is using my ageing orchestral template (dating back to 2011 or so, with countless tweaks made over the years) and it has a variety of issues, among others weak strings. This will be the last project I use it for, I'm going to create a new and more modern master template later this year. The reason I'm using it is that parts of these tracks were composed almost two years ago, originally for another game, but they were rejected and we decided to reuse them for this new game. And I simply don't have time to create a new template for this project and record the tracks anew, so I'm sticking with the old one, trying to make the most of it.

(01-31-2017, 03:46 AM)peastman Wrote: [ -> ]Very cool!  This really reminds me of Nobuo Uematsu's soundtrack for The Last Story.  Very similar sound, and with the same sense of drama.  Except more ethnic instruments, which are also really cool.  I like the way you've managed to get lots of variety while still making it all sound coherent.

Thanks! You're not the first one to say that my music sounds JRPG-like, though it is a genre of games I know virtually nothing about.

(01-31-2017, 07:52 PM)Paul Battersby Wrote: [ -> ]I'd be happy if my finished work sounded like your work in  progress.

There is a lot of depth here in the way you use the orchestra for counterpoint, rhythmic support and accents. Music worthy of study. It all sounds very clean, well thought out. I would have had a lot of fun performing this music back when I was a percussionist in my high school orchestra because your music always seems to give the percussion section lots of interesting parts to play.

Thanks Paul. I must confess though that the percussion on several of the tracks are loops, many of them from The Beat Aesthetic Taiko lib that was released as freeware sometime around when I first started working on this music. So I can not take credit for all of it.
(01-31-2017, 01:02 AM)Samulis Wrote: [ -> ]Haha WOW! I had the exact same experience with the exact same film. I used to just sit on the DVD main title page just to hear the main theme loop over and over again. It captured my imagination as a teenager at the time- THAT was epic music, not a gajillion taikos and cellos doing straight eighths over trombones who ate too many beans.

Yep, definitely agree with that! Great theme and a great score, though sadly underrated.

(01-31-2017, 01:02 AM)Samulis Wrote: [ -> ]The only other film I was impressed by was John Powell's score to How to Train a Dragon, but not as much as LWW. In a similar vein, Percy Jackson and the Olympians (bad film, good score- Christophe Beck) had a pretty classic style score- it's pretty much textbook and is full of great examples of the various tricks and techniques of hollywood writing and orchestration.

Now that you mention it, I remember both How to Train a Dragon films having good music. I might need to go back and check them out. Lovely films as well! I did watch Percy Jackson and the Olympians some time after you mentioned it months ago, and you're right -- terrible movie with good music. Such a waste Smile
Night at the Market is a textbook example of how to do rapid establishment properly. As soon as the violins hit that first phrase, you start getting a feel of what said market might be like. Shady, questionable, perhaps a bit dangerous? In my opinion, that's what game soundtracks are supposed to be like, especially when the cues that are there for thematic consonance (as opposed to e.g. Tarantino-style thematic dissonance).

Just keep doing what you're doing! Smile
Pages: 1 2 3 4