Scoring Central

Full Version: Guerrilla Sampling Guide
You're currently viewing a stripped down version of our content. View the full version with proper formatting.
Pages: 1 2
Hey guys,

I just started writing a "Guide to Guerrilla Sampling" (not Gorilla Sampling), based on my experiences creating VSCO 2. I managed to throw together the first 10,000 words tonight (now I need to SLEEP), but I hope to finish tomorrow with the rest of the section on 'flying solo'.

I'm open to any suggestions or feedback! Let me know.

https://versilianstudios.wordpress.com/2...-sampling/
Impressive man! Interesting and well written. It makes me appreciate the work of sampling much more. Both technical and (shudder) human based.

I don't know where or if it applies, but a number of people have commented that they might use my more lightly sampled / one mic position pianos in live performance where they want something more deeply sampled, with more mic positions for recording. Is there a niche for live performance instruments?
(01-15-2017, 02:49 PM)bigcat1969 Wrote: [ -> ]Impressive man! Interesting and well written.  It makes me appreciate the work of sampling much more. Both technical and (shudder) human based.

I don't know where or if it applies, but a number of people have commented that they might use my more lightly sampled / one mic position pianos in live performance where they want something more deeply sampled, with more mic positions for recording. Is there a niche for live performance instruments?

"(shudder)"... you crack me up, BC. XD

Glad to hear you think it's good so far. Now I just gotta finish it...

There is a niche for live performance instruments, I'd say. I don't know how much it has to be deeply sampled or have many mic positions (I would assume you would want to avoid overly reverby samples and things that can't run on a standard laptop), but I guess something with 3-5 velocity layers and 2-4 RR would work fine. Bottom line is that it has to be easy to control- no crazy key control things that some fancy instruments have nowadays. Ease of use is a major component of this.
Epic work, Sam! I'll read it a couple more times, let it sink in, and let you know if I come up with any suggestions. Smile

Your take on product differentiation seems to relate to audio software development as a whole. As someone getting their hands dirty with plugin development, I found it to be a nice read. Smart, yet concise. Smile
(01-15-2017, 10:02 PM)Otto Halmén Wrote: [ -> ]Epic work, Sam! I'll read it a couple more times, let it sink in, and let you know if I come up with any suggestions. Smile

Your take on product differentiation seems to relate to audio software development as a whole. As someone getting their hands dirty with plugin development, I found it to be a nice read. Smart, yet concise. Smile

Thanks, Otto!

A lot of it can definitely be applied to other fields for sure!

I've just about finished the text portion of the project at about 14,500 words. I still want to add a few more pictures and graphics, as it's a little text-heavy right now.
An interesting read. You covered many things that would otherwise only be learned the hard way.  I don't think I'll be venturing into sample recording any time soon. I'm deep into looping already recorded samples. Looping samples is task that just seems to go on and on and on and on and on ... forever.
(01-15-2017, 11:39 PM)Paul Battersby Wrote: [ -> ]An interesting read. You covered many things that would otherwise only be learned the hard way.  I don't think I'll be venturing into sample recording any time soon. I'm deep into looping already recorded samples. Looping samples is task that just seems to go on and on and on and on and on ... forever.

Thanks, Paul!

Looping definitely isn't one of my favorite activities either. Luckily there are some decent tools and techniques for it in Kontakt. In Maize, you have to figure out sample numbers for start and stop that work naturally (zero crossings) and enter them... a job requiring two monitors and a lot of patience! For the most part, I've thus forgone looping for Maize instruments.
(01-16-2017, 12:28 AM)Samulis Wrote: [ -> ]Luckily there are some decent tools and techniques for it in Kontakt. In Maize, you have to figure out sample numbers for start and stop that work naturally (zero crossings) and enter them...

Fortunately, I have a very good tool for looping samples that makes it easier than it would otherwise be but some samples are stubbornly resistant to looping. Even after finding a smooth loop point, the waveform between the loop points can still make it obvious that there is a repeating loop. Much like you've done for documenting your sampling experience, I might do the same for my experiences looping samples after I'm finally done.
(01-16-2017, 01:44 AM)Paul Battersby Wrote: [ -> ]Fortunately, I have a very good tool for looping samples that makes it easier than it would otherwise be but some samples are stubbornly resistant to looping. Even after finding a smooth loop point, the waveform between the loop points can still make it obvious that there is a repeating loop. Much like you've done for documenting your sampling experience, I might do the same for my experiences looping samples after I'm finally done.

"Going Loopy" by Paul Battersby.
(01-16-2017, 02:16 AM)Samulis Wrote: [ -> ]"Going Loopy" by Paul Battersby.

Probably an accurate assessment of my state of mind at the moment and a potential title if I write an article about it.
Pages: 1 2